My Photo

Definition

  • [es-pree de less-ka/-iay] (idiom) A witty remark that occurs to you too late, literally on the way down the stairs. The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations defines esprit de l'escalier as, "An untranslatable phrase, the meaning of which is that one only thinks on one's way downstairs of the smart retort one might have made in the drawing room."

StatCounter

Blog powered by Typepad

« Sweet, dusty smell of books | Main | A bit of a lag... »

November 08, 2005

Comments

I certainly read about this movie with great trepidation, too. I like the Ehle/Firth version very much (except for the "new" bits with Lydia, something that Jane Austen would NEVER have written), but my favorite is the Garvie/Rintoul one, and like you, I don't really see much need for another version. It seems like somebody said, "What can we get for Keira to sink her teeth into? I know, 'Pride and Prejudice'!"

To this version's credit, I think the so-called mullet comes from the fact that (judging by the few stills I've seen) the designers seem to have moved the time period back twenty years or so, and the fashions are much more Romantic, less Regency -- hence, longer hair on the men, etc. (Why they've moved it, I don't know....)

I'm keeping my fingers crossed -- early reviews are actually good...!

The comments to this entry are closed.